Tautochronos

Berlin-based artist Michel Lamoller had developed a way of layering time-lapse photographs to create either a sculpture or a new 2D image.  

Lamoller's subjects melt into their surroundings, with only certain parts of them remaining visible. He takes around 10 photographs of a particular place, with each photograph showing a particular change in the scene.

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A slightly different approach.

During the summer holiday, I have had time and space to think more about my route through this course. In previous courses I have systematically worked my way through my course file. This approach meant that I didn't always have the time or opportunity to develop my ideas at a greater depth. However, this time around I have several ideas about different points in the course, which are continually developing. With so many different ideas whizzing around, I thought it best to jot some of them here, before I forget them!

Assignment 1

It has taken me a while to decide on a theme for this task. It is quite open ended, which creates an almost infinite amount of possibilities. After looking at the work of John Stezaker, I would like to follow that line of enquiry, as mentioned in the assignment guidance. 

At the moment, there is a lot of upheaval in the world of politics. At home. Theresa May has clung on to power, whilst Trump and Macron have been elected to the top job, without any prior political experience. These are uncertain times at the moment, involving unpredictable personalities. Therefore, I have decided to combine the faces of political adversaries for part 1. 

For part 2, I would like to try something more closer to home.

Assignment 2 

My initial idea was to collate photographs of people ignoring others, unaware o their surroundings, whilst using their digital devices. This is a very current issue at the moment. One idea is to blur the area surrounding the person preoccupied with their handheld device. Now that I've had time to think about this further, I would like to hide QR codes within the images. When scanned, the viewer would then be able to see the full image clearly. This will present some technical challenges for me, but  by thinking ahead, I have enough time to try to work it out.

Assignment 3 

There are a choice of questions for the critical review. At the moment, I would like to explore the issue about the 'digital self', so that this helps me to develop my understanding of digital identity. I am wondering if I can refine the question further to focus specifically on selfies. 

I plan to expand on these ideas further in future blog posts.  

 

VR and QR

Digital cameras, whether they're DSLRs, point and shoots, tablets or smart phones, are now so advanced that it is difficult to imagine how they can be improved further.  

The price of memory cards has continued to go down, whilst the amount of available storage has increased in gigabytes to terabytes. Surely there are only so many images that you would want to risk leaving on a memory card without backing them up. Meanwhile, digital cameras are able to capture images in more than 20 megapixels. Would it be necessary to produce images greater than that, when the majority of them will be either filling up pixels on the screens of digital devices, or languishing somewhere on an external hard drive? 

What will be the next major development for digital photography? As the need for data storage increases, maybe there will be a more efficient alternative to megapixels. Could holographic images be the next focus?

At the moment Virtual Reality offers a lot of potential, placing the viewer within the visual experience. This year has seen the rise of oculus goggles and other gaming devices. I wonder if this will be just another fad, which goes the same way as 3D TV. It's difficult enough to find the remote control, without having to look for your 3D glasses as well!

Recently on Facebook, one of my friends had uploaded a group photograph. There were so many people in the group, that it was taken using the panorama setting. When displayed on the screen, the viewer could tilt their phone to 'explore' the image. I really liked how this enabled the onlooker to determine what direction they went in to review the image.  It reminded me of the virtual reality environment of computer games.

My iPhone has a pano setting, which I have never used before. I am wondering if I could adopt it for my course. I can see the potential of it, and it appears not to be widely used. However, I am aware of the danger of letting the technology lead the project. I will only use it if it feels appropriate to use. 

Whilst I was thinking of new approaches to photography, I thought about how QR codes are used and how they haven't really developed further. QR, or Quick Recall, codes are the small black and white squares, that appear on posters and promotional material. Similar to bar codes, QR codes can be scanned to access other associated information, such as a weblink, map,  or video. Once again, the technology offers lots of potential, yet it hasn't really been fully utilised. I am wondering whether I could use QR codes in my own photography. This is something I would like to explore further. 

Exercise 1.1

Task: Create a series of images using layering techniques. Then produce a 500-word blog post on the work of one contemporary artist-photographer who uses layering techniques. 

The image above is a composite of two photographs based on Ariana Grande's One Love Manchester concert. Following the Manchester Arena atrocity, the young singer encapsulated the resilience and strength of the city and community. I intended to overlay her face over the fundraising concert at the Old Trafford cricket ground. 

The image above is a composite of two photographs based on Ariana Grande's One Love Manchester concert. Following the Manchester Arena atrocity, the young singer encapsulated the resilience and strength of the city and community. I intended to overlay her face over the fundraising concert at the Old Trafford cricket ground. 

Whenever I am being a tourist, I often find myself waiting for an opportunity for another photographer to take a picture of the same subject, from the same viewpoint as myself. Sometimes, I decide not to take the photograph, because the scene is so readably available on a quick Google image search. I want to be taking photographs that offer something new and different. Whilst research photomontage, I was intrigued by Corrine Vionnet's work. Appropriating similar photographs, taken at identical locations, really resonated with me. The photograph above is a montage of photographs taken of the Bull, outside Birmingham's Bull Ring shopping centre. Every time I have visited there, there are crowds of people waiting to photograph it. 

Whenever I am being a tourist, I often find myself waiting for an opportunity for another photographer to take a picture of the same subject, from the same viewpoint as myself. Sometimes, I decide not to take the photograph, because the scene is so readably available on a quick Google image search. I want to be taking photographs that offer something new and different. Whilst research photomontage, I was intrigued by Corrine Vionnet's work. Appropriating similar photographs, taken at identical locations, really resonated with me. The photograph above is a montage of photographs taken of the Bull, outside Birmingham's Bull Ring shopping centre. Every time I have visited there, there are crowds of people waiting to photograph it. 

Similarly, this image of the Leaning Tower of Pisa (above) is a compilation of many similar photographs. It reminds me of Martin Parr's photograph, in 'Small World', of a number of people attempting to have their photograph taken, trying to either push over, or keep the tower upright. 

Similarly, this image of the Leaning Tower of Pisa (above) is a compilation of many similar photographs. It reminds me of Martin Parr's photograph, in 'Small World', of a number of people attempting to have their photograph taken, trying to either push over, or keep the tower upright. 

I liked the monochromatic element in Idris Khan's images. I decided to experiment with using a black and white montage of images I found on the Internet, of the Statue of Liberty (above) and an old VW Beetle (below). I feel that the lack of colour enables the viewer to concentrate on the form and shape of these two distinctive objects.

I liked the monochromatic element in Idris Khan's images. I decided to experiment with using a black and white montage of images I found on the Internet, of the Statue of Liberty (above) and an old VW Beetle (below). I feel that the lack of colour enables the viewer to concentrate on the form and shape of these two distinctive objects.

Having created the image of the Beetle (above), I started to think of the current environmental issues. The image above is a composite of the outline of a car superimposed onto a deforested part of the city. The photograph would be intended to be used to illustrate how the increase in traffic leads to deforestation, in order to build more roads and cars. 

Having created the image of the Beetle (above), I started to think of the current environmental issues. The image above is a composite of the outline of a car superimposed onto a deforested part of the city. The photograph would be intended to be used to illustrate how the increase in traffic leads to deforestation, in order to build more roads and cars.