Martin Parr

One of the most popular street photographers is Martin Parr, who creates thought-provoking images. Instead of focusing on each individual image in isolation, he considers them to be part of sets, or projects, to present a stronger message or statement.

Whilst watching Parr's Tate Shots interview (above) I was surprised to hear that a lot of his work is 'constructed' and that it is fictional. I had always thought, perhaps naively, that Martin Parr looked to capture the 'decisive moment' in his images. Maybe this makes images even more intriguing to the viewer who perceives them as reality. Photographers allure to achieving a 'style' of photography, a type of image that can be assigned to them. Parr has achieved this, not through technique, but through the messages he wants to convey about how he perceives society. Parr's photographic projects can be easily recognised for their humour, and colour. They contain larger than life characters locations that we can associate with.

© Martin Parr 1990 Small World: The Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy (Permission granted). Tourists pose as if holding the famous tower. 

© Martin Parr 1990 Small World: The Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy (Permission granted). Tourists pose as if holding the famous tower. 

Parr's career began at the Butlins holiday resort in Filey, where he made his name documenting a particular kind of Englishness. 

Martin Parr's work has got me thinking about how my assignments should link together with an underlying message or statement. When planning my next assignment I should be thinking of the overall theme rather than 12 individual images. During DPP my assignments were very clearly thought out, but I realise that this shouldn't always be the case. You can go out with the aim of capturing a particular type of shot, but not at the expense of missing something better.